Art Scene & {Seen} Ashley Gaile Harris - Art Advisory LLC

Art Scene & {Seen}

Ashley Gail Harris, Art Advisory LLC
From the Streets to Sotheby's... Art Scene & {Seen}

LA: AVANT DE RENTRER, IL FAUT INCENDIER LA MAISON @ THOMAS DUNCAN GALLERY

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JUNE 21 - JULY 31, 2013

AVANT DE RENTRER, IL FAUT INCENDIER LA MAISON


Kerstin Brätsch
Nikolas Gambaroff
Lucas Knipscher
Nick Mauss
Charles Mayton
Marie Michaels
Sean Paul
Clément Rodzielski
Nora Schultz
Valerie Snobeck

Because the soul is progressive, it never quite repeats itself, but in every act attempts the production of a new and fairer whole.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson, On Art

I can’t believe it. No, I will not lie, I can easily conceive of it.
- Samuel Beckett, Molloy

If I do everything in my own interest, it is because the interest I have in myself comes before everything else.
– Seneca, On Benefits

This exhibition focuses on the evolution of certain forms of production that are realized by the dismantling of external elements and uniting them into an internalized and intentionally conflicted whole. This activity is inherently schizophrenic and therefore results in a multifarious yet not unresolved output.

The title roughly translates to “before returning home you must burn down the house” – which could mean, among other things, that engaging with oneself one requires continual processes of disassembly in an effort to form a united, cohesive self. The linguistic shift in the exhibition’s title is representative of the passage from one state of being to another, with inevitable (and intentional) slippages in implication. Also at play are fractured, interrupted systems: disassembly/assembly, self/duality, subjectivity/influence, privacy/publicity, singularity/multiplicity. The exhibition seeks to locate itself in the fold between these states, in moments of transition and contradiction.

THOMAS DUNCAN GALLERY
6109 MELROSE AVENUE
LOS ANGELES, CA 90038
T. 310 494 1177
E: INFO@THOMASDUNCANGALLERY.COM


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LA:LA: Opening TMW #GRAPEVINE~ #MagdalenaSuarezFrimkess #MichaelFrimkess #JohnMason #RonNagle #PeterShire curated by #RickySwallow

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Ron Nagle
Unabana, 2013
mixed media
3 x 6.25 x 2.5 inches
(7.6 x 15.9 x 6.4 cm)

3143 S. La Cienega Blvd, Unit A
Los Angeles, CA. 90016
T 310.558.3030
F 310.558.3060
www.davidkordanskygallery.com
info@davidkordanskygallery.com

GRAPEVINE~
Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, Michael Frimkess, John Mason, Ron Nagle, Peter Shire 
curated by Ricky Swallow
July 13 – August 17, 2013

Opening reception: Saturday, July 13, 6:00–9:00pm

GRAPEVINE~ was conceived as way of exhibiting a group of artists who have all worked in clay, in California, for more than 40 years. Throughout that time these artists have always sought to contradict the limitations of the medium in terms of its craft parameters. It might sound obvious, but there is something about this work brewing on the West Coast. I can’t imagine it surfacing anywhere else with its strangeness paired with such dedication to finish and quality. The show is intended to reflect a fan’s perspective rather than an exhaustive attempt to chronicle the history of the ceramics movement in California, as the Pacific Standard Time exhibitions recently performed this function perfectly.

It’s revealing to consider the works on view in light of the current state of ceramics in the contemporary art world. Though clay is drawing new attention among younger artists, these “visitors,” as one ceramics elder described them to me, seem to be focused on bringing out the medium’s malleable qualities. Meanwhile the “permanent residents” are very much still exceeding themselves in the studio. The specific agendas put forward by publications like Craft Horizons in the 1960s and 70s, calling for the promotion of new directions in ceramics, could today seem like a fence, limiting any cross-pollination between craft and contemporary practices. The work in GRAPEVINE~, much of it created during the extended “lost weekend” the medium experienced over the previous decades, resonates more than ever right now as a retroactive influence.

Historically the very nature of the ceramic medium implies the tradition of setting up a studio (or pottery), building the appropriate kilns, and constantly performing glaze and clay body tests in order to attain the desired effect. To me, this romantic (some might say dated) discipline is the thing that separates the work of the permanent residents from that of the visitors. For instance, John Mason still mixes his own clay body in an archaic industrial bread mixer, and Michael Frimkess develops latex gloves with stainless steel fingernails in order to throw his large vessels (without the aid of water) to the desired thinness. This rigor results in specific families of forms that can be identified throughout each artist’s body of work––in many cases recurring motifs span decades of object-making––and a sense of serious play is always checked by technical discipline. 

Perhaps even more surprising is the range of cultural information that makes appearances in so many different ways: I’m thinking about how art deco, custom car culture and architecture informs Peter Shire and Ron Nagle’s work; or how popular staples of American comic imagery adorn the classically-inflected pots of Michael and Magdalena Suarez Frimkess; or the way Mason’s work has such a Jet Propulsion Laboratory-engineered vibe. The more familiar gestural “abstract expressionist” style of the 50s and 60s, which for many defines ceramics-based work from California, is only a small part of the story. In subsequent decades these artists found their own specific languages, a natural evolution as the medium was applied toward more purely sculptural ends. At the same time, they were crossing paths in studios and universities, influencing each other and the course of the ceramics movement at large.

For instance, Nagle was in San Francisco paying close attention to the gang surrounding Peter Voulkos (who is represented in the exhibition by a small work gifted to Mason during their time as studio mates); this gang eventually became the group of ceramicists associated with Ferus Gallery here in Los Angeles, though I was surprised to learn how influential Michael Frimkess’s early works were for Nagle at the time. Revered by other artists working with clay, Frimkess never received the same ongoing exposure as Ken Price, Billy Al Bengston and Mason, who were his peers studying under Voulkos in the mid 1950s at the Los Angeles County Art Institute (later Otis College of Art and Design). Magdalena Suarez Frimkess, meanwhile, came from a sculpture background, studied in Chile, and never trained formally as a potter. She began by working collaboratively, glazing Michael’s pots from the time they met in the early 60s in New York, before starting to make her own sculptures and hand-formed pots in 1970. Arriving a few thousand years after the Greek and Chinese vessels they resemble, and a few decades before the pictorial pots of Grayson Perry, these objects occupy a place between many genres and continue a rich tradition of narrative storytelling through pottery.

Shire, some years younger than the others in the show, was also a keen observer, later becoming friends with Nagle and Mason––it was Peter who first introduced me to John. Interestingly, there was already an existing connection between Shire and Frimkess, as their fathers were acquainted through labor unions in Los Angles in the 1940s and 50s, and both artists were raised in creative households infused with progressive politics, modernism, and craftsmanship. And one can perhaps trace connections between Shire’s Memphis-associated work and the moment when Nagle’s earliest, more malleable cup variations gave way to a pre-Memphis form of architecture. More recently Nagle’s work has featured stucco-like, spongy, ikebana-core tableaux, and archimetric structures made with a model maker’s precision; parts are shaped, adjusted and fitted together, and glazed with multiple firings to wizardly effect. 

The fastidious steps behind all of the works in GRAPEVINE~ remain available to the viewer as tight information, yet always with enough variation and nuance to locate them within the studio environment as opposed to more familiar traits of outsourced fabrication. The formal training of a potter (a skill which is now weeded out of the few ceramics programs still in place) is visible in all of this work: proportion, the lift provided by a well-trimmed foot, and the energy and circulation of the clay itself are still defining factors. For the most part all included works have come directly from the artists, and I am grateful to have been allowed such a degree of physical searching and selecting during studio visits. The privilege of this access has both shaped the show in a very tactile and subjective manner, and allowed a greater understanding of the historic, technical, and conceptual conditions that inform each piece. 

In addition to the artists, I would like to thank Ryan Conder, Karin Gulbran, Vernita Mason, Pam Palmer, Lesley Vance, and David Kordansky.

For further information, a comprehensive interview with each of the artists in the show can be found archived online in the Smithsonian Archives of American Art:http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/

––Ricky Swallow


GRAPEVINE~ will be accompanied by a forthcoming catalogue. Please contact the gallery for further details.


www.davidkordanskygallery.com info@davidkordanskygallery.com

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NYC: TMW THE AFRIKA BAMBAATAA MASTER OF RECORDS OPEN ARCHIVE @ Gavin Brown’s Enterprise #GBE #GavinBrownsEnterprise #AFRIKABAMBAATAAMASTER #records #vinyl #JohanKugelberg #BooHoorayGallery

GBE 

PRESS RELEASE 
THE AFRIKA BAMBAATAA MASTER 
OF RECORDS OPEN ARCHIVE
 




Gavin Brown’s enterprise 
620 Greenwich Street 
New York NY 10014 
July 11 – August 10, 2013 

Gavin Brown’s enterprise and Johan Kugelberg/Boo-Hooray Gallery, together with Afrika Bambaataa, the Universal Zulu Nation, and Cornell University Library announce the public archiving of one of the most important record collections in the history of hip hop: 

The Afrika Bambaataa Master of Records vinyl archive. 

From July 11 through August 10, Kugelberg and his team will be organizing, cataloguing, and documenting Afrika Bambaataa’s peerless vinyl collection at Gavin Brown’s enterprise, Monday through Friday between 12 – 5 PM. Visitors are encouraged to stop by, hear some great music and see how the cultural artifacts of this important strand of American history are preserved. 

Open archiving, like an archeological dig or a group of students viewing biological research in a museum, is an important and rarely seen part of the process of documenting history. Before the Afrika Bambaataa archive moves to its permanent home at Cornell University’s Hip Hop Collection in the Fall of 2013, Johan Kugelberg and Gavin Brown’s enterprise offer visitors a unique opportunity to experience what is arguably the most important gathering of vinyl in the history of hip hop while it is sorted, organized, archived (and DJ’d) in full view of the public. 

Please join the Afrika Bambaataa vinyl archive mailing list and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for announcements of visiting DJs playing selections from the archive during the sort. 

Join the mailing list here


// 


Afrika Bambaataa is considered the godfather of hip hop culture and was instrumental in the rise of electro funk and break-beat deejaying beginning in the 1980s. His involvement with Bronx street gang the Black Spades in their transformation into community activists is legendary, as is his founding of the internationally known hip hop organization Universal Zulu Nation. Bambaataa is responsible for spreading and popularizing hip hop’s unmistakable sounds and beats alongside its culture throughout the world.
 

Originally from the South Bronx, New York, Afrika Bambaataa is among the most influential American DJs. 

Due to his early use and mixing of drum machines and computer sounds, Bambaataa created signature beats (such as his first widely popular single “Planet Rock” of 1982), which helped fuel the development of other musical genres such as Freestyle or Latin Freestyle, Miami Bass, Electronica, House, Hip House, and  early Techno. He has consistently made records nationally and internationally, spanning the 1980s into the  2000s. 

In 2012 Afrika Bambaataa was appointed to a three-year term as a Visiting Scholar at Cornell University,where his vinyl collection will reside as part of the Cornell University Library Hip Hop Collection, the largest  collection on Hip Hop culture in the world. 


Universal Zulu Nation Link 

Cornell Hip Hop Archive Link 

Bambaataa Visiting Scholar Link 

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LA: S H I P W R E C K E D 6-10pm AMERICAN GRIZZLY, SO MANY WIZARDS, SPOKENEST, CHERRI POP, EMILY LACY, BATWINGS CATWINGS, FRENCH VANILLA @Night Gallery LA …

__|=|_|=|__
\ o.o.o.oY/ 
\_______/

AMERICAN GRIZZLY, SO MANY WIZARDS, SPOKENEST, CHERRI POP, EMILY LACY, BATWINGS CATWINGS, FRENCH VANILLA, SNEAKY SNAKE, THUNDERBUMMER (FIRST SHOW), JAWS, DUNES, MATHEW TIMMONS, LESSNESSES, W-H-I-T-E, TALL PAUL and CAYAL with LA PORSCHA, AIR POP, MARGIE SCHNIBBE, GENEVA JACUZZI, YACHT (DJ SET) +MORE TBA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
/|\
/_|_\
____|____
\_o_o_o_/

VENDOR FAIR WITH:
OTHERWILD
VAGRANT FORMS
EITHER WAY
SALLY SPITZ
SODAS + SANDWICHES BY EDEN’S HERBALS
TAROT READINGS WITH SARAH FAITH
DELICIOUS BAKED GOODS BY CLARA CAKES 
M R K N T A R O T
AMY VON HARRINGTON CAKES & GOODS
MARVIN ASTORGA TAROT
NEVER PRESS
PIE STAND

+ MORE TBA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
_~
_~ )_)_~
)_))_))_)
_!__!__!_
\______t/

VIDEO LOUNGE WITH VIDEOS BY:
CARRIE KEITH
CALI DEWITT
MARIAH GARNETT
GUSTAVO HERRERA
GURU RUGU
AIMEE GOGUEN
JUSTIN LONG
JULIE LEQUIN
ANDREW COX
DEVIN KENNY
JEMIMA WYMAN

+ MORE TBA

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
_~ _~
__|=|_|=|__
\ o.o.o.oY/
\_______/

SHIPWRECKED T-SHIRTS FOR SALE WITH ART BY:
HARSH PATEL
SCG (SALLY SPITZ, CHRISTINE WANG, and GUS HERRERA)

JUL 6, 12 - 10PM

Night Gallery is located at 2276 East 16th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90021 | 323 589 1079 | info@nightgallery.ca 


Tues - Sat | noon - 7pm

http://nightgallery.ca/event.php?id=86&name=S_H_I_P_W_R_E_C_K_E_D_

NYC: Tonight KAYA III - #BoskoBlagojevic #Eindhoven #47canal #concept #happening #vitoacconci #performance #fluxus #contemporaryart


47 Canal

 

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KAYA III


July 2 - August 4, 2013

opening 6-8pm



Here’s a simple game that two people can play. 

Meet your friend someplace outside in a big city. Then choose a path. 

The path should be circular, which means you can follow it and end up where you started. The path should take you about 10 or 15 minutes of walking to make a full circle. An example path might be a few city blocks, or an enclosed park area. Like Union Square.

Now that you’ve decided on a path, begin walking in one direction down the path while your friend walks in the other direction. It’s important to feel young when you walk.

Let your mind drift. Look at the people around you—hopefully you’ve chosen a path and a time of day that’s crowded, busy. Hopefully there are many interesting faces and buildings around you.

Don’t forget about your friend. Since you’ve agreed on the same path, you’ll meet them soon. When you do meet your friend, somewhere halfway down the path, pause for a moment with them. Stop walking and kiss your friend. 

After the kiss, don’t say anything. Continue walking in the direction you were heading before you stopped. Continue down the path. Your friend should do the same, but in their own direction.

You can keep playing this game, making many circles around the same path. 

The game ends when you stop meeting your friend.

 

Bosko Blagojevic
Eindhoven

 

 

47 Canal Street, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10002  

summer hours tuesday - saturday / 12-6p


(Source: 47canal.com)

MUST SEE NYC : MIRA DANCY - BODYTONIC @KANSASGALLERY #KANSASGALLERY #MIRADANCY

KANSAS

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MIRA DANCYBodytonic

 

June 28 - August 3, 2013

OPENING RECEPTION 28 June, 6-8 PM

KANSAS is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of Mira Dancy. Opening June 28, the exhibition will run through August 3, 2013.

It’s a messy narrative loaded with cameos.

 

A fluid she, a statue broken up

won’t be interrupted

or be still, still

 

I set out to see her. A mythical she.

The seer, the teller, the siren, the body temple

of when I saw her

 

I thought the thigh of the dancer

is a kind of heart

pumping pulse —

 

she laughs at you

static

and you feel yourself

cartoon yourself

 

straining to calculate

whether the word or the wind

is stronger

 

And which is it you want

at your back?

 

Which whisper unlocks your sex

with the kind of color that flares from one star

to the next

 

so many million years late?


Mira Dancy (b. 1979, UK) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She received an MFA from Columbia University, 2009 and a BA from Bard College in Annandale, NY, 2001. Her solo exhibitions include Night Gallery, Los Angeles, CA and Monya Rowe, New York, NY. Her work has also been seen in such venues as Bull & Ram, SouthFirst, Exit Art, and Max Protetch Gallery among others. Dancy has been a Guest Lecturer at Bard College and Brooklyn College and currently teaches Painting at Columbia University.

  

The gallery is located at 59 Franklin Street, three blocks South of Canal between Broadway and Lafayette. The closest subways are A/C/E,6,J/Z,N/Q/R and W at Canal and the 1 train at Franklin. For additional information, please contact Steven Stewart at KANSAS by calling +1 (646) 559-1423 or emailing steven@kansasgallery.com

 

More here

K A N S A S 

59 Franklin Street

New York, NY 10013

+1 (646) 559-1423

info@kansasgallery.com

kansasgallery.com

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NYC- Conversations: Among Friends #SamGilliam and #RashidJohnson @MuseumModernArt 7pm #MoMA

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Conversations: Among Friends, Featuring Artist Rashid Johnson and Laura Hoptman, Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA

Thursday, June 27, 2013, 7:00 p.m.

Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater), mezzanine, The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building

Presented by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Conversations: Among Friends explores works of art as reflections of their political and social contexts. The evening features a conversation between artists Sam Gilliam and Rashid Johnson, moderated by Laura Hoptman, a curator in MoMA’s Department of Painting and Sculpture. The program will explore Gilliam and Johnson’s work—and how it is shaped by, responds to, and reflects the artistic, historical, political, and social context of its making. Following the program, guests are invited to continue the conversation and meet the participants at an intimate reception catered by Fantasy Fare in the Cullman Mezzanine.

Rashid Johnson was born in 1977 in Chicago, IL, and studied at Columbia College Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2001, Johnson’s work was included in Freestyle, an exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem curated by Thelma Golden. The show featured 28 up-and-coming artists whose work Golden considered to be “post-black,” a term defined by Golden as “characterized by artists who were adamant about not being labeled as ‘black’ artists, though their work was steeped, in fact deeply interested, in redefining complex notions of blackness.” Johnson, who was 24 years old at the time and the youngest artist in the exhibition, presented photographs from his Seeing in the Dark series of portraits of homeless African American men in Chicago. The work drew critical attention, and since then, his practice has become central to the “post-black” movement. Johnson’s mixed-media work incorporates a wide range of everyday materials and objects, including wax, wood, steel, brass, shea butter, ceramic tile, books, records, VHS tapes, live plants, and CB radios. With shamanistic inspiration from both African American history and art history, many of Johnson’s more recent works employ these materials in a way that suggests an indefinite form of mysticism and a role as devotional objects. Johnson’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Walker Art Center, and in ILLUMInations, the 54th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, among others. In 2009, he had a solo show at SculptureCenter in New York. In 2012 Johnson enjoyed his first major solo museum exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, had first solo show in the U.K. at the South London Gallery, and won the David C. Driskell Prize. His current solo exhibitions include New Growth at the Ballroom Marfa, TX; and his upcoming shows include Rashid Johnson: Message to Our Folks at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA, and the Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, MO. Johnson currently lives and works in New York, NY.

Laura Hoptman is a curator of contemporary art in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art, where she is currently organizing a career retrospective of the German sculptor Isa Genzken, and an exhibition on contemporary painting. Since joining the Museum she has organized Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, a group exhibition of contemporary art dealing with language; Artist’s Choice: Trisha Donnelly; and, with Peter Eleey, a mid-career survey of the work of the Los Angeles painter Henry Taylor at MoMA/PS 1. Previously, Hoptman was senior curator at the New Museum where she organizedUnmonumental: The Object in the 21st Century, The Generational: Younger Than Jesus, and monographic exhibitions on Tomma Abts, Elizabeth Peyton, Brion Gysin, and George Condo. In 2004/2005 she was the director of the 54th Carnegie International, and, as a drawings curator at MoMA from 1996 to 2002, she curated the first U.S. museum exhibitions of Rirkrit Tiravanija, Maurizio Cattelan, John Currin, and Luc Tuymans among others. In 1997, she was the co-curator of Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, a show that reintroduced Kusama to international audiences, and in 2002, organized Drawing Now: Eight Propositions, a landmark exhibition of contemporary figurative drawing.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. 
Program begins at 7:00 p.m.
Followed by a reception at 8:15 p.m.

Tickets ($35) can be purchased online, through the Friends of Education office, and at the lobby information desk and the film desk.

Conversations: Among Friends is made possible by TD Bank.


http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/events/18393